Retirement village booklet wins Plain English Award


Retirement Village booklet award Churton 300pxRetirement village contracts are dense and hard to understand at what can be an emotional time for families, but a booklet that helps navigate contracts and other retirement village decisions has won a Plain English award.

Thinking of Living in a Retirement Village?, developed by Troy Churton of The Commission for Financial Capability (CFFC), won the People’s Choice prize at the 2018 Plain English Awards ceremony in Wellington last night (November 15).

There are currently more than 38,700 residents in 382 retirement villages throughout New Zealand, and that number is growing quickly as the population ages and retirement village companies open new complexes. Today’s numbers are up from about 27,000 in 351 villages five years ago.

As National Retirement Villages Manager at CFFC, Churton travels the country giving talks for people thinking of moving to a retirement village, and their families. CFFC is a government agency and one of its roles is being an impartial monitor of the industry and supplier of information to the public.

As National Retirement Villages Manager at CFFC, Churton travels the country giving talks for people thinking of moving to a retirement village, and their families. CFFC is a government agency and one of its roles is being an impartial monitor of the industry and supplier of information to the public.

Churton says he wrote the booklet for retirees and their families, aiming to strike a balance between conveying important technical information in a way that was easy to understand. The booklet offers practical tips and checklists to help ease a decision-making process that must navigate complicated legal and financial terrain at what can be an emotional time for families.

Selling a home and moving into a retirement village has far-reaching consequences for the remainder of a retired person’s life, and effects the estate they will pass on to their loved ones.

“CFFC believes it’s important that intending residents and their families understand the implications clearly and can make a considered decision based on impartial information,” says Churton. “We’re very pleased that the public has found our booklet so helpful.”

The judges said: “This document breaks down highly complex, life-changing information into accessible chunks that the average New Zealander can easily absorb. This is an outstanding communication that meets a pressing public need.”